Review -

Long Term Test 2015 | Thomson Elite Dropper Post Review

When the first dropping seatposts hit the market they were viewed as nothing short of witchcraft, but now they are considered almost as essential as tyres and brakes. With the new release of the Race Face and Easton dropping posts, nearly every component manufacturer now has a post promising to be the lightest, most reliable or most durable. When US component craftsmen Thompson released their Elite Dropper Post with 125mm of travel, everyone was keen to know if the post would show the same level of quality and reliability that had defined their brand.

We have two Elite Dropper posts on the test team, and we have put in a cumulative 14 months riding and over 3000km of constant up and downs.
So, before we get into how they performed, lets take a look at the post itself. The Elite Dropper Post weights 592g and has an infinitely adjustable travel range, actuated by a stealth cable. Build quality is exceptionally high as you would expect, and the micro adjust seat clamp is both secure and well designed. There is no need to regulate air pressure, and there is no adjustment for the extension speed. Instead, extension speed is regulated by pressure on the lever. However, most riders simply push it all the way down because even at full speed, the post extends smoothly and without a jarring end stop. After over 1500km in the long term test program it was time to check in on the post to see how it was performing.

The neat micro-adjust seat clamp has been creak free and hasn’t slipped once.
The neat micro-adjust seat clamp has been creak free and hasn’t slipped once
The seat collar has proven secure and the bushings are still free of play
The seat collar has proven secure and the bushings are still free of play
After 1500km, the stanchion is still free of marks and wear
After 1500km, the stanchion is still free of marks and wear
The remote is neat and takes up minimal space on the bar
The remote is neat and takes up minimal space on the bar
The only issue we have is the end cap on the cable keeps falling off, resulting in a frayed cable
The only issue we have is the end cap on the cable keeps falling off, resulting in a frayed cable
We are looking forward to many more trouble free miles
We are looking forward to many more trouble free miles

Bottom Line

After over 3000km the Thompson Elite Dropper’s have proven very reliable. One post had to go back for a new seal when it jammed in the up position, but the work was carried out quickly under warranty. Unlike many rival posts there is zero play in the extended position, not the slightest wobble and the seatposts have never failed to extend when asked. The hard gold coating on both posts is still scratch free and we are still running the original cable on one post after 1500km. Both posts still have a notch free action and can be operated even when sitting far forward or rear on the saddle. Aside from the one small issue, the posts have been reliable when rival brands have needed re-bleeding or servicing. We will report back on internal wear when the posts have been through a full strip down and service, but currently there is nothing to suggest that they need any attention.

The only things we do not like is the small remote lever, although it’s nice and compact on the bars, there’s no textured finish on the surface and it becomes slippery and hard to locate in the wet or when at full speed. Also the cable exit under the remote has proven hard to cap, the fitted cap came adrift quickly resulting in a frayed cable. We will look to fit a new cable soon and pay special attention to the end cap.
In the hands of our testers the Thompson Elite Dropper Posts have proven themselves exceptionally reliable, and after numerous races and over 150 cumulative rides both still function as precisely as when they came out of the box. The Thompson is one of the most expensive posts on the market but the Thompson reliability and build quality should demand a premium.

More information: bikethomson.com/elite-dropper-seatpost

Words and photos: Trev Worsey