Review -

Back Issue | In Review: Felt Edict 1 29er

From our New School XC article in issue #015, where we sought to find the all-rounder, the XC bike that could handle Enduro rides and dominate in all aspects, the Felt Adict does dominate, but not in the respect we were hoping. Without further ado, our hands on, trail thrashing review:

If we’d been conducting a cross-country race-bike test, the Felt Edict 1 would’ve been the hands-down winner. Or maybe we should say, the arms-up, victory-saluting winner. Either way, if your main mission in life is to shred lap after lap of singletrack between colorful course-marking tape, then get down to your local Felt dealer as soon as possible, and put your money on an Edict for the win. Yes, this bike is that good.

From tip to tail, the Edict 1 is smartly and tidily appointed. A RockShox SID RL 100-millimeter fork and RockShox Monarch RT3 handle suspension duties. Felt’s FAST suspension technology relies on flex engineered into the seat-stays to coax 100 millimeters of active suspension out of the back. The company has outfitted this quick little 29er with a SRAM X01 drivetrain (with a threaded bottom bracket), while Easton EA70 wheels and Felt’s house-brand bars, stem, and seatpost round out the mix.

From an XC point of view, this Felt Edict is a piece of art.
From an XC point of view, this Felt Edict is a piece of art.
We pounded the Felt Edict around the steep, technical trails of Santa Barbara, California.
We pounded the Felt Edict around the steep, technical trails of Santa Barbara, California.
With the Edict being a more XC orientated bike, you'd expect it to climb well.
With the Edict being a more XC orientated bike, you’d expect it to climb well.

TeXtreme carbon technology, which once lived within the company’s FRD (Felt Racing Development) line of bikes, has made its way down to the Edict 1. With its roots in Formula One and aerospace, TeXtreme is carbon-fiber technology from Sweden, and it uses flat strands instead of round carbon yarn. According to Felt, the result is a bike that has much more stiffness at a significantly lower weight. Tired of all the marketing noise about lighter and stiffer? We are too, but that lighter-and-stiffer thing is immediately evident – like, punch-you-in-the-face evident – when you push on the pedals and point the Edict in about any direction.

The World Cup podium focus and laser-beam precision that make this bike so interesting as a cross-country race machine made it a bit of a handful when judged within the parameters of our more gravity-biased test. This should come as no surprise, though, considering the Edict’s 71.5-degree head angle. This is a bike that is incredibly competent and capable, but it won’t tolerate any inattention. You will need to bring your A-game to the Edict.

TeXtreme carbon technology, which once lived within the company’s FRD (Felt Racing Development) line of bikes, has made its way down to the Edict 1.
TeXtreme carbon technology, which once lived within the company’s FRD (Felt Racing Development) line of bikes, has made its way down to the Edict 1.
“Tired of all the marketing noise about lighter and stiffer? We are too, but that lighter-and-stiffer thing is immediately evident – like, punch-you-in-the-face evident – when you push on the pedals and point the Edict in about any direction.”
“Tired of all the marketing noise about lighter and stiffer? We are too, but that lighter-and-stiffer thing is immediately evident – like, punch-you-in-the-face evident – when you push on the pedals and point the Edict in about any direction.”

Conclusion:

Of all the bikes on our test, none were as polarizing as the Felt. Testers with the most XC riding on their resumés had a blast pushing this bike past its intended design, while those with riding styles developed on longer-travel bikes found that the Edict’s ride quality turned “challenging” – and even occasionally “terrifying” – quite quickly.

“The Edict has a 71.5-degree head angle. This is a bike that is incredibly competent and capable, but it won’t tolerate any inattention. You will need to bring your A-game to the Edict.”
“The Edict has a 71.5-degree head angle. This is a bike that is incredibly competent and capable, but it won’t tolerate any inattention. You will need to bring your A-game to the Edict.”

So who should buy this bike? Only riders with a love for the ride of an XC race-bike need apply. Sure, slackening the front end with a longer fork would mellow this thoroughbred out a bit. But who wants a mellow racehorse?

Weight: 23.2 lbs/10.3kg

Price:

€4.500.00

Specifications:

  • Frame: Felt XC, UHC Performance + TeXtreme carbon fiber
  • Shock: Rockshox Monarch RT3
  • Fork: RockShox Sid RL 100mm
  • Headset: FSA No.42
  • Handlebar: Felt MTB carbon, flat Ø31.8mm 9° sweep, 720mm width
  • Shifters: SRAM X1 11-speed
  • Rear Derailleur: SRAM X01
  • Crankset: SRAM X01 carbon, single: SM – 170mm MD/LG/XL – 175mm
  • Brake Levers: SRAM X0

For more info visit: feltbicycles.com

Words: Joe Parkin Photos: Abner Kingman